Posted 5 months ago
Posted 5 months ago
Posted 5 months ago

bestnatesmithever:

Guys, this is the DIRECT word of God, so….

(Source: memewhore)

Posted 5 months ago

fuckyeah1990s:

Twin Peaks first aired 24 years ago today, April 8th, 1990. 

(Source: mysimpsonsblogisgreaterthanyours)

Posted 5 months ago
Posted 5 months ago
Posted 5 months ago

BORIS | Quicksilver [From upcoming album: NOISE]

Posted 5 months ago

And in case you’re wondering: No, a cheeseburger with a hot dog, fries, and a slice of apple pie on it is not good.

It’s one of the best things I’ve ever put in my mouth. 

Posted 5 months ago

abloodymess:

sxt:

Chicago Eatery Creates a Burger/Hot Dog Hybrid

Just in time for opening day, ROCKS Lakeview and ROCKS Lincoln Park in Chicago create a Ballpark Burger: a burger with all the flavorings of a hot dog

Have you ever been firing up your grill and couldn’t decide whether to eat a juicy hamburger or a plump hot dog?

Now you won’t have to choose — if you’re a Chicago resident or Cubs fan that is — because ROCKS Lakeview and ROCKS Lincoln Park have created and are serving a hot dog/hamburger hybrid. No this isn’t some frankenfood; the ballpark burger takes all the flavorings and fixings of a classic Chicago-style hot dog and puts them onto a burger. It’s being dubbed “Baseball on a Bun.”

No.

The Goblincock from Kumas was/is pretty damn good. 

My friends and I “invented”  a burger with a hot dog on it a few years back.

It also had fries and a slice of apple pie on it.

The “All-American Burger”.

Posted 5 months ago

suburbanite-gangst3r:

i emotionally connect with this cat

(Source: onlylolgifs)

Posted 5 months ago

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

oldbonesanddust:

bombsfall:

The tide of 90s nostalgia continues to rise, so I thought I’d break this out again to set the record straight.

Instead of tumblr’ing, groups of us all hung out at Dennys or the Kettle so we could smoke cigarettes (yes inside!) and talk about the alternative music we had heard rumors of and write in journals.

I don’t buy the first one. I didn’t listen to much independent music, but I listened to a little bit, because (a) even in rural areas, teenagers make bands and go play shows with other bands (b) people move in and out of areas, bringing their music with them (c) Rolling Stone used to actually review a really interesting assortment of stuff in its back pages, which is how I wound up listening to Yo La Tengo and begging my parents to take me to Dallas to see Welcome to the Dollhouse — we couldn’t make it before it left the theater, but the local video store was actually amazing, so I just rented it later.

Being from a fucking country podunk town (granted we are 50 miles from Chicago, but when you are 11-15 it feels like forever away) we still managed to know about “cool” things. If you were really interested in something (music, photography, film, skateboarding) you hunted it down. The people with outside interests sorta banded together in my school and shared info and turned each other on to other stuff (without the internet!). If you had no interest in popular culture at a time without the internet you had to work a bit harder to find alternatives, but they were there. Tape trades, writing to zines and distros and bands! Talking to people at the record store. Even in my little town I could get my hands on cool little film quarterlies and find and read about awesome films. Sure it was harder to see some films, and it wasn’t instant, but there was a big VHS trading network available; that’s how I saw some early Buñuel films and Warhol stuff. 

The internet really didn’t change everything so much. It just changed how we do it.

Yes! “Viral” videos predate the internet, or we wouldn’t have the glory that is the exploding whale video or the Winnebago man. I was in a really culturally deprived area, and like, my tastes weren’t that sophisticated or great, but I still knew enough to go to the used record store to find old, interesting stuff or to ransack the library for weird sci fi. Assuming people can’t find cool things when those things aren’t handed to them on a platter does such a disservice.

YES! I forgot just how awesome the library was to finding things. So many cool sci-fi and monster film books. Weird relics from the 60s and 70s. Old magazines. So much good stuff can be found even in the small town library. 

I grew up in a small town (cue Johnny Cougar) and I wasn’t near anything remotely like a big city. I didn’t have many friends, but I did spend a lot of time at the library, and while I didn’t actively start listening to music until I was like 13 or 14 (which felt like I had waited so long to discover this stuff at the time, but in retrospect that’s probably the average age for that sort of thing) I was able to find cool music. I just read about music as much as I possibly could.

I like to think I found all kinds of cool music eventually, because I managed to befriend some cool people. Same goes for all the weird movies I watched as a kid.

I’d just read interviews with band members and filmmakers I liked, and when they would mention who influenced them or who they liked, I would try to track that stuff down. It was definitely a lot more work back then, but let’s not act like it didn’t happen.

Posted 5 months ago
Posted 5 months ago

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cullen–Harrison_Act

So I guess it turns out I am (probably) related to one of the guys who repealed prohibition.

Makes sense.

Posted 5 months ago
Posted 5 months ago

THE GREAT LAKES SUPER QUAKE